What do Mexican food restaurants and communicators have in common?

Two of my hobbies are eating and practicing public relations. The other day I was at one of the many Mexican food restaurants in Arizona. I noticed everything on the menu was made with tortilla, rice, beans, salsa, cheese, chicken, steak and pico de gallo.

Most of those items are thrown together to make tacos, tostados, burritos, enchiladas, quesadillas or chimichangas. It made me realize Mexican food consists of the same ingredients, just presented in different ways depending on what you order.

As communicators, we do the same exact thing as Mexican food restaurants….

We combine words to create sentences. We use those sentences to create press releases, media advisories, columns, blogs, pitches, tip sheets, editorials, web articles and more.

We have the same basic ingredients for most of the writing we do, but we present it in different ways depending on who our audience is. Depending on what the client or the journalist wants, we tweak the way we present our sentences for their interest. For example, you know there have been times when you have used your marketing materials in your press releases and your web stories.

It’s ok to repurpose, you’re giving the customer what they want.

*Blogger’s note: I can’t believe I actually posted this.

6 Responses to “What do Mexican food restaurants and communicators have in common?”

  1. AndreWillis (Andre Willis) - June 15th, 2009

    I’m craving mexican food thanks to @BrianCamen‘s latest blog post. http://www.theprpractitioner.com/?p=487

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  2. Suzy - June 16th, 2009

    Great metaphor! It’s OK to post it, especially the nugget, (the pico de gallo?) at the bottom of the post, which is the point. In repurposing, however, create more than a remix of a golden oldie. The tone may have to change, so new ingredients might also be in order. Say, some cilantro and lime juice.

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    admin Reply:

    Suzy,

    You make a great point. New ingredients might be added. Just like social media is now a part of most PR pros position. Three years ago these new ingredients or social media was barely ever heard of.

    Brian

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  3. Robin Phillips - June 17th, 2009

    Nice, Brian. I’d take this one step further and say that we all need to get our ingredients in shape. We retool the same basics, but if our basics are flawed (old, wilted, sour) then it doesn’t matter how we present them.
    So pay attention to your basics: honesty, clarity, sincerity, and a true desire to make connections. Or fresh beef, homegrown tomatoes, and sweet sweet onions.
    @RobinJP

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    admin Reply:

    Robin,

    I 100% agree with you. We need to make sure our basics aren’t flawed and our ingredients haven’t expired!

    Brian

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  4. ScribeDevil - June 17th, 2009

    Sounds like someone’s been eating corporate, chain Mexican food. Have you checked out Mucho Gusto on University? Awesome!

    Re: the point of the post: I couldn’t agree more. I think good, efficient MarComm pros are like managers of content factories or assembly lines—especially in times like these. Every executive presentation, every meeting with a subject matter expert and even every sales PPT contains content worth mining and converting for your e-newsletter, landing pages, press releases, blog posts, client wins/case studies, etc. Crank out the copy, get the relevant approvals, print and ship, rinse and repeat. That simple! 

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